More slivers and slices

June 16, 2007

In my on going review of Sharon b’s TSTC stitches via the French knot stitch in week 24, I’m hitting weeks 16 through 20 today. I wish I was flying through my day so fast but I’m way off schedule. I waited until the last minute to do Father’s Day shopping (in the USA on Sunday). I think a lot of other folks did, too, if the line I was standing in was any basis for making a judgement about such things.

Still no positive identification on the variation. I’ve heard of a couple of possibilities. On one I’m trying to a little more research; this one does not look like it is shaping up to be match. On the other I’m waiting for a response to my inquiry for more information; it’s too early to make any evaluation about it. I’m keeping Sharon in the loop and will post as soon as we have any more news. I certainly appreciate all of those who have stopped by to look and pulled out books or checked other sources for information. If you’re looking and find something, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment. Thank you very much!

Week 16 Palestrina stitch

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Week 17 running stitch

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Week 18 woven and whipped wheels

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Week 19 Basque stitch

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Week 20 butterfly chain stitch

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More French knots — exploring ideas with the new variation

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Inspiration and a new blog on my bloglines account

May 21, 2007

Update: Yes! Things are working again. I don’t understand but it was something between my browser and the blog software. I just relaxed and followed instructions. So photos are now added. If you haven’t been over to see the butterflies that Annie at Annies Crazy World has been making, please, do take a look. She not only shows her beautiful seam treatment, but also how to make the butterflies.

And Gayle, please forgive me for misspelling your name earlier. I am so sorry. I just now caught it–of course, having the spell checker helped. But I do know better, especially since one of my very dear cousins back east is named Gayle.

Judith at Spinningyarns is new on my blogline account. She has recently started blogging. Already I’ve been clicking way and finding interesting things from the links on her posts as well as enjoying her own needlework on the crazy quilt that she has started. In case you’re wondering about the name Spinningyarns, she spins her own silk and that lead to her rekindled interest in embroidery. She also enjoys flower gardening and has snapped a few pictures of her plants that she posts at Everything in the garden’s Rosy…. And as you may know I love flowers so I stop there, too.

As far as inspiration is concerned, that’s what I encountered when I came rushing into the TSTC flickr account and found this sampler by Gayle of stichintime. I could not get the last row out of my mind. From the moment I saw it, I felt like it was a special interpretation of this stitch and so inspiring to me. Gayle has done other great samplers and recently did a columbine plant that very special.

Pre update paragraph: No pictures! Yes, I’m so sorry. My “send to editor” button will not work to upload pictures on to this post. I’ll be updating later in the day, if it becomes available. Second major problem this morning is that other photos are still on my card because Photoshop Elements won’t recognize my card and thinks there is nothing in the drive. I’m going to be working on the problem and will either do a separate post or add with the first photos on this post. Last time this happened it was as simple as buying an new card holder. In the meantime, I hope you’ll enjoy Judith’s and Gayle’s blogs with their photos.

New Updated area: When I wrote Gayle asking permission to post and so forth. She wrote me back saying, she, too, had been looking at that row and wondering what it would look like stacked or spaced differently. And as I explained to her that’s all I did with it when I played around with it. And I’m hoping as time allows she will be able to follow up on some of her ideas, too. Since she is the one who made that sampler, I think her ideas will flow much more freely and more fully than any thing I can do here.

Here it is side by side and stacked

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Side by side and stagger (brick) stacked

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Tips touching and what a nice darning pattern it could have been, too.

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I just love think about the patterns that could be made if these were grouped together in various arrangements! I wish I’d had more time to stitch this out. And this next one, too.

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The photo give you a little idea of what happens when one of these concepts is stitched out. Please forgive me for not hidding the threads. There is the small white diamond as in the third photo (I just hid the riding tie downs) Then there is diamond made of the thread from the five stitches placed together, on the right hand side the large diamond from four cluster of the five stitches and on the left the large white diamond around the small diamond of five stitches together. Well, you can tell I’m excited. I don’t know if I’m talking sense in a way that anyone else can understand. Sometimes you just have to ignore me! I want to stitch some more of these out in the next few weeks as time allows and if it doesn’t I’m going to put them in my pattern software and save them for future reference.

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Here’s a much simpler idea I tried to stitch out.

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Then I played with the inversion (I hope that the correct word for the concept) of the straight stitches with these results.

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Day 5 of the Butterfly chain stitch

May 19, 2007

A much better stitching day yesterday, at lease from my point of view. I worked on some of the potential I saw in the disappointing stitching from day before yesterday. And I still need to tackle full circles. But I got some work done on curves.

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I like the beads at the bottom best.

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This is a pretty silvery purple wool thread but it is not photogenic. This isn’t the first time I’ve had problems capturing it. Aside from that one problem, I like this line. It reminds me of a line of tiny fans and I wish I could put some interesting stitch at that top to further that impression. So far my best thought has been a little angled straight stitch for the top tip of each straight stitch to a few threads lower on the next straight stitch–workable but not interesting.

An enlarged slightly modified version of my happy little line from yesterday and my favorite of today’s photos.

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Another little border
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A flower

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Blue circles

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Day 4 of the Butterfly chain stitch

May 18, 2007

Yesterday I realized with a start that I’d not practiced my curves and circles. And I had a terrible first trial. In fact, I might say I had a terrible stitching day. But that’s how some days are. Some major good things happened in other areas so perhaps my mind was focused elsewhere.

Now back to circles, if you can ignore everything else you may be able to see that the outside points could be connected to form a circle — of sorts.

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My next attempt was to try a curve and see if touching points would help (see the top half of the photo below). That concept had worked in some of my lines earlier in the week. My evaluation: some improvement, worth another try or two to develop.

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Since things were not going to well, I decided to take a break and in the course of that wandered over to the flicker account. Help was there! Vero had posted a tag with great examples of curves and circles. The bottom portion of the circle is my attempt to play with that idea. Thank you, Vero! I need a lot more practice. But I see real potential.

Here are some more attempts at curves. The first one is what I call my happy little line.

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The next one is “on grid” play with an “off grid” idea from the other day. It attempts to use the build up of stitches to effect a curve as well as using the points along the top to give a rough outline of that same curve.

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More on the line front.

A border line

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A different arrangement of the semicircles. I think it needs a thinner thread and more and longer straight stitches.

My first attempt at layered lines

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Not exactly as I wanted it, so here it is re-managed a bit.

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Two tie down threads and more

May 17, 2007

Here are a couple more ideas on the lines with two tie down threads.

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Then I got completely carried away with the idea. And went from well ordered to …

First trial

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Second

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Third

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Seeing beyond orange

May 17, 2007

I hope you’re able to see beyond orange in my samples. When I’m exploring I often use the same color so I see past the color and catch the pattern. It helps me decide the best pattern or rhythm without being influenced by color.

Here is a second version of the grid using the last stitch from yesteday’s post. The tie down thread weight is the same as the straight stitches and that affects the pattern but the major change is the staggered arrangement of the stitches.

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Do you see the white diamond shape? I see one and that is one of the reasons this grid appeals to me.

Here is the third version of the basic stitch.

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Now, here is the third version in a grid.

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In this grid I see interconnecting orange circles. If I’d used a larger pattern sample it would be more inescapable. But I’d stitched enough for my sampler that I could recognize it. There are a lot of other shapes in this grid. For instance, a heavier tie down thread weight might have brought attention to the squares. And with the arrangement here below that may be what is noticed.

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Definitely, not my favorite grid.

Now if not above, I think in these I’ve wandered over into a triple tied rice stitch rather than sticking with a butterfly chain stitch.

Here are some line versions:

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Here is a grid:

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You may be as happy to learn I ran out of orange thread as I was to stitch myself out of it last night!


Day 2 of the Butterfly chain stitch

May 16, 2007

Except for my tension problem I’m having a lot of fun with this stitch. I had to see what it would look like if there were two tie down rows. Now that I’ve seen what happened here, more ideas are popping up.

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These next four photos show work inspired by Sharon b’s third sample. For some reason it reminded me of a rice stitch. A rice stitch with a tie down rather than a cross. So that is how I’ve worked it.

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Here’s the first version a diamond. And its grid.

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And here’s another version.

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And below is one of the grids that could be done with this stitch. There is at least one more grid variation that I’ve done and that is perhaps better. Nevertheless, this one is an interesting design.

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It seem to me that it would be much improved if the thin thread for tying was white. I have gotten away from using a thread the same color as the background to block out portions of a stitch, but I think it may be used very effectively in some patterns.